PR, Social Media, and Everything in Between

Posts tagged ‘Twitter’

Users In Disguise: Fake Twitter Accounts


Ridiculous

Image Credit: "Ridiculous" By victoriafee

Fake Twitter accounts can be annoying, and sometimes they can be ingenious. The idea of a fake twitter account is acting like someone believable enough that everyone thinks you are that person.

Everyone wants to follow them to see what amusing tweets they post next, so they end up having real influence. @BronxZooCorba has an influence on Klout of 88 with over 50,000 unique tweets. @Darthvader has a Klout of 78.

These fake twitter accounts (see also parody twitter accounts) work because the voice is unique and authentic. Imagine if a school mascot, like Florida Southern‘s Mocise, talked about campus events in a voice unique to the mascot.

Take for instance @BronxZooCorba. The Bronx Zoo had a corba escape. The Twitter account is the corba’s encounters throughout the city. Even after the real corba was captured, the tweets continued.

The snake visits ball games and comments on tourists. This account has the potential to be a great asset to the NYC bureau of tourism or business.

I think there is real potential for a business with a mascot or spokesperson to create a fake twitter account to generate publicity and leads.

What’s your favorite fake twitter account?

UPDATE: PR Daily posted an article that gives the 3 social media lessons from @bBronxZooCorba. You can read the article here.

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How do I measure this stuff anyway?


After taking an entire semester to study the use of social media for Public Relations, I know a few trillion reasons why and how social media can be useful.

measurement

Image Credit: "February 15, 2011" By Beto Ruiz Alonso

One of the most interesting things to learn has been how you can measure the success of social media campaigns. Measurement is obviously important if you want to be paid because companies want to know the bottom line before they spend money.

Social Media Examiner offers some great tips on how to create a strategy to measure social media. Remember that analytics mean nothing if you’re not measuring the right thing.

Here’s a breakdown of some useful, free ways to measure your reach through websites, Facebook, and twitter.

Google Analytics – Arik Hanson wrote a great post on his blog to explain 5 uses to measure blog activity

Facebook Insights – tool on Facebook that provides great statistics for pages

Klout – measures individual twitter accounts

What are some other great tools that PR agents can use free?

 


This post was sparked by an article on PR Daily.

Guest Blogger: Whitney Gonzalez “Twitterville Review”


The following post was written by guest blogger Whitney Gonzalez. You can view the original post on her blog. I choose to share this blog with you in light of the recent changes Twitter has undergone.

Twitterville Review

What could be better than a book all about Twitter? I picked up Shel Israel’sTwitterville as part of a social media book assignment and enjoyed reading it. I learned a lot about Twitter’s beginnings and the different ways in which it was adopted.Twitter can be more of a listening tool than people think. One can Twitter search their name or company’s name and obtain accurate results of what’s being said out there about them or their company. It can be just about as accurate asGoogle Alerts.

Although it may seem like you are tweeting to the entire twitterverse, by using @replies and DMs (direct messages) one can make Twitter as intimate as a telephone conversation.

One thing that stood out from Twitterville was the Google “sucks” test. If you type your name or company’s name in Google and type “sucks” after it and a lot of results return, you just may “suck.”

Overall, Twitterville was a great book and anyone that has an interest in social media can benefit from reading this book. By learning about Twitter from a slightly different angle, students can benefit upon searching for a career in social media because they will be familiar with everything Twitter.

Widgets, and badges, and more: Oh my!


It’s not as much fun to say as lions, and tigers, and bears, but I’ll explain why they can be more helpful than carnivorous mammals.

lions and tigers and bears

Image Credit: "Pick me! Pick me!" By captainxo

A few things you should know before we get started…

Widgets

First, according to Wikipedia, a widget is “a stand-alone application that can be embedded into third party sites by any user on a page where they have rights of authorship (user can edit coding of page).”

Example:

I use widgets a lot on this blog. If you look on the right side, each of the different items is a widget enabled by the blog theme. There’s a widget at the bottom of the page too! (See word clouds.)

Badges

Second, also according to Wikipedia, a badge is “a small image used on websites to promote web standards, products used in the creation of a web page or product, to indicate a specific content license that is applied to the content or design of a website.”

Think of badges as bling or flair. You can show of all the cool stuff that means something to you.

Example:


HTML5 Powered with Connectivity / Realtime, CSS3 / Styling, and Graphics, 3D & Effects

I got this badge off the HTML5 logo creation site. You often have to click on the badge to find out what it means. Maybe you should do that for this one too! 😉

Practicality

For a company or nonprofit, the use of badges and widgets can come in handy. A company can create a badge or widget for others to display on their website. For donating to a cause, someone could get a “giving badge” to share.

A widget can be created to provide a special service to either clients or potential customers. Think industry news! Or a countdown till the release of a book, movie, or event. People love to display widgets (gadgets for windows) on their desktop and blog, so make sure whatever you create is versatile.

Sharing Your Favorites


In 1999 the web was new, and AOL was the one of the major internet providers. In comparison to today, I feel odd anytime I use Internet Explorer. We’ve come a long way in the evolution of internet browsers, although favorites/bookmarks are still a staple.

Poppy Wedding

Image Credit: "Poppy Wedding" By Sarah Parrott

The days of pressing the little heart to add a site to your favorites have passed. It’s no longer practical to connect your bookmarks to single web browser or computer. These days we have something new: Social Bookmarking.

How It Works

Step 1: Create an account on a social bookmarking site. (I use Diigo!)
Step 2: Surf the web, and find relevant content (It’s up to you to define relevant.)
Step 3: Using the bookmarking service, bookmark the link.
Step 4: Add tags to the bookmark, so you can find it next time you’re looking for it.
Step 5: Share these links with others by using public settings or connecting with your friends.

 

Benefits for Students

As a college student, I can use anywhere between 2 and 5 different computers in a single day. Some of the school computers connect through a common user name, but they still don’t connect to my personal laptop.
Group projects become simpler and easier when group members have a common group on a social bookmarking site to post links relevant to the project. I like to use social bookmarking in combination with Google Docs (it also has a chat feature). I can link to a reference material and the project assignment page.
Additionally, you can have one tag for an organization or your school website. For instance, I have a link to the library page, career center page, registrar office calendar page, and school intranet. I also have links to course pages (i.e. professor’s blog and textbook companion website).

Do you use social bookmarking? Why and how?

Side Note: I love using StumbleUpon. When you like a page, you actually save a bookmark for the page. StumbleUpon is different from other sites because it recommends new sites for you. Also, a great cure for boredom.

Location-Based Services: I’M HERE!


Where in the World is…?

In a world of increasing connectivity, location-based services are the next step in social networking. With sites like Foursquare, individuals can check-in to locations via their cell phone. You can see friends nearby, and sometimes swoop in on special deals.

Image Credit: "dodgeball vs. Google Latitude? (at least now we know why they're phasing out good 'ol dball)" By

I was discourage when I first learned about foursquare. As a college student, my mom graciously pays for my cell phone service. That doesn’t include a smart phone. Most lBS are only compatible with smart phones. When I went on the four square website, I found a video that explained foursquare (Howcast and wordpress don’t communicate well, so I was unable to post it.)

I’m going to start engaging with foursquare via text message! What do you think of IBS applications?

Business Perks

I recently attended the Social Fresh Tampa where @SchneiderMike gave a presentation on LBS. He’s co-author of “Location Based Marketing for Dummies” (buying this book for myself soon). He talked about the different way companies can engage consumers beyond check-ins.

1.      Content (i.e. Photos, tips, and recommendations)

2.      Activities (i.e. Challenges and games)

3.      Rewards (i.e. points, coupons, and free stuff!)

@SchneiderMike also highlighted the importance of making sure the rewards are cool and available to everyone. For example, Ben & Jerry’s has a special for everyone: 3 scoops for $3 (the mayor gets an extra scoop for free of course).

Sad Face of LBS

Eric Leist wrote all about the future LBS in the blog post “Beyond The Checkin: A Look At The Future of Location Based Services.” Leist points out that on drawback of LBS are the privacy issues. LBS check-ins might one day be linked to the swipe of a loyalty card. But do you really want everyone to know where you shopped and what you bought?

Another potential drawback dealing with privacy issues would be the ability for someone to track your movements. Stalking suddenly just became a whole lot easier. If you use LBS, are you concerned about privacy?

Jump On Board with Social Media


In the podcast “Speakers & Speeches: Social Media, Friend or Foe?” a panel at a Ragan Communication conference mock pitches social media to a CEO. The panel discusses a wide range of topics including blogs, facebook, and management of social media within a company.

Image Credit: "Working Together Teamwork Puzzle Concept" by lumaxart

I learned about company intranets, which I found useful. I’m currently a student, and have little interaction with intranets. Florida Southern College uses the “portal” to communicate with students, but the site has limited functionality. I think it would be helpful if the site had more functions that instructors knew how to utilize. The idea of a college-based intranet was the foundation for Facebook after all.  Where do you see the future of social media and education headed?

 

The panel also discussed splitting the work load of a blog among the company’s employees. I know that many blogs I read feature several different contributors. Disney actually uses this model on their company blog. I think the model works effectively for them. Do you know of any other company blogs that clearly identify multiple writers and use the model effectively?

Best Buy‘s employee social networking site was a highlighted case study in the podcast. Best Buy created Blue Shirt Nation as an internal social networking community for their employees. The site link is currently down. I went out and tried to find another example of an internal community. I was unable to locate one. Send me another one if you find one. I’d be interested in seeing what one looks like.

Lastly, I heard the idea of a “cloud” come up several times. My understanding of the term is that it’s a place where digital information is stored and can be accessed. I googled “digital cloud,” and it seems that the term refers to any information on the web. Do you think the world wide web is a cloud or a storm of information?

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