PR, Social Media, and Everything in Between

Posts tagged ‘Social network’

How do I measure this stuff anyway?


After taking an entire semester to study the use of social media for Public Relations, I know a few trillion reasons why and how social media can be useful.

measurement

Image Credit: "February 15, 2011" By Beto Ruiz Alonso

One of the most interesting things to learn has been how you can measure the success of social media campaigns. Measurement is obviously important if you want to be paid because companies want to know the bottom line before they spend money.

Social Media Examiner offers some great tips on how to create a strategy to measure social media. Remember that analytics mean nothing if you’re not measuring the right thing.

Here’s a breakdown of some useful, free ways to measure your reach through websites, Facebook, and twitter.

Google Analytics – Arik Hanson wrote a great post on his blog to explain 5 uses to measure blog activity

Facebook Insights – tool on Facebook that provides great statistics for pages

Klout – measures individual twitter accounts

What are some other great tools that PR agents can use free?

 


This post was sparked by an article on PR Daily.

Guest Blogger: Whitney Gonzalez “Twitterville Review”


The following post was written by guest blogger Whitney Gonzalez. You can view the original post on her blog. I choose to share this blog with you in light of the recent changes Twitter has undergone.

Twitterville Review

What could be better than a book all about Twitter? I picked up Shel Israel’sTwitterville as part of a social media book assignment and enjoyed reading it. I learned a lot about Twitter’s beginnings and the different ways in which it was adopted.Twitter can be more of a listening tool than people think. One can Twitter search their name or company’s name and obtain accurate results of what’s being said out there about them or their company. It can be just about as accurate asGoogle Alerts.

Although it may seem like you are tweeting to the entire twitterverse, by using @replies and DMs (direct messages) one can make Twitter as intimate as a telephone conversation.

One thing that stood out from Twitterville was the Google “sucks” test. If you type your name or company’s name in Google and type “sucks” after it and a lot of results return, you just may “suck.”

Overall, Twitterville was a great book and anyone that has an interest in social media can benefit from reading this book. By learning about Twitter from a slightly different angle, students can benefit upon searching for a career in social media because they will be familiar with everything Twitter.

StumbleUpon Cures Boredom


StumbleUpon (the cool discovery and recommendation site I browse when I’m bored) reached 1 billion stumbles per month in April 2011. I was really excited to see that so many people find the site as useful as I do.

I’ve written about StumbeUpon before. You can add the StumbleUpon toolbar to any browser to make stumbling easy too.

Here are a few things I stumbled upon this week.

1. Silk – a site that lets you drag your mouse to create interactive artwork

 

Image Credit: "Silk Screenshot" by Megan Getter

 

2. Quotations of Dr. Seuss – my favorite of those listed: “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

 

Image Credit: "Dr. Seuss Quotations Screenshot" By Megan Getter

 

 

3. S’mores Bars – I haven’t had a chance to try the recipe, but I want to soon.

 

Image Credit: "S'mores Bar Screenshot" By Megan Getter

 

 

Facebook Lets It All Hang Loose


New Facebook Terms Allows Confiscating Furniture

Image Credit: "New Facebook Terms Allows Confiscating Furniture" By HubSpot

 

Whenever you add the latest app on Facebook, do you ever consider what you’re allowing them access to? How valuable are your email and phone number?

In an article posted on Mashable.com, @SarahFKessler looked at Facebook’s decision to allow third-party apps to access individual user’s information.

Since I’ve started using Facebook, there have always been tons of apps that seem essential to my interaction on the site. From Farmville to AOL, I love the idea of connecting all my sites with a single login. I have fewer passwords to keep track of this way!

However, consumers of Facebook have long faced the paradox of privacy and connecting. We inherently can’t connect with people unless we share something with them.

On Saturday, Facebook will launch the first verison of their new privacy policy. It will be devoid of all the lawyer-ish jargon that some complain makes the current version hard to understand.

I don’t think most people will bother looking at it. After all, nobody reads EULA’s anymore either (if they ever read them…) Do you think Facebook and lawmakers should protect us from own ignorance about privacy?

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