PR, Social Media, and Everything in Between

Posts tagged ‘Facebook’

How do I measure this stuff anyway?


After taking an entire semester to study the use of social media for Public Relations, I know a few trillion reasons why and how social media can be useful.

measurement

Image Credit: "February 15, 2011" By Beto Ruiz Alonso

One of the most interesting things to learn has been how you can measure the success of social media campaigns. Measurement is obviously important if you want to be paid because companies want to know the bottom line before they spend money.

Social Media Examiner offers some great tips on how to create a strategy to measure social media. Remember that analytics mean nothing if you’re not measuring the right thing.

Here’s a breakdown of some useful, free ways to measure your reach through websites, Facebook, and twitter.

Google Analytics – Arik Hanson wrote a great post on his blog to explain 5 uses to measure blog activity

Facebook Insights – tool on Facebook that provides great statistics for pages

Klout – measures individual twitter accounts

What are some other great tools that PR agents can use free?

 


This post was sparked by an article on PR Daily.

Guest Blogger: Whitney Gonzalez “Twitterville Review”


The following post was written by guest blogger Whitney Gonzalez. You can view the original post on her blog. I choose to share this blog with you in light of the recent changes Twitter has undergone.

Twitterville Review

What could be better than a book all about Twitter? I picked up Shel Israel’sTwitterville as part of a social media book assignment and enjoyed reading it. I learned a lot about Twitter’s beginnings and the different ways in which it was adopted.Twitter can be more of a listening tool than people think. One can Twitter search their name or company’s name and obtain accurate results of what’s being said out there about them or their company. It can be just about as accurate asGoogle Alerts.

Although it may seem like you are tweeting to the entire twitterverse, by using @replies and DMs (direct messages) one can make Twitter as intimate as a telephone conversation.

One thing that stood out from Twitterville was the Google “sucks” test. If you type your name or company’s name in Google and type “sucks” after it and a lot of results return, you just may “suck.”

Overall, Twitterville was a great book and anyone that has an interest in social media can benefit from reading this book. By learning about Twitter from a slightly different angle, students can benefit upon searching for a career in social media because they will be familiar with everything Twitter.

Widgets, and badges, and more: Oh my!


It’s not as much fun to say as lions, and tigers, and bears, but I’ll explain why they can be more helpful than carnivorous mammals.

lions and tigers and bears

Image Credit: "Pick me! Pick me!" By captainxo

A few things you should know before we get started…

Widgets

First, according to Wikipedia, a widget is “a stand-alone application that can be embedded into third party sites by any user on a page where they have rights of authorship (user can edit coding of page).”

Example:

I use widgets a lot on this blog. If you look on the right side, each of the different items is a widget enabled by the blog theme. There’s a widget at the bottom of the page too! (See word clouds.)

Badges

Second, also according to Wikipedia, a badge is “a small image used on websites to promote web standards, products used in the creation of a web page or product, to indicate a specific content license that is applied to the content or design of a website.”

Think of badges as bling or flair. You can show of all the cool stuff that means something to you.

Example:


HTML5 Powered with Connectivity / Realtime, CSS3 / Styling, and Graphics, 3D & Effects

I got this badge off the HTML5 logo creation site. You often have to click on the badge to find out what it means. Maybe you should do that for this one too! 😉

Practicality

For a company or nonprofit, the use of badges and widgets can come in handy. A company can create a badge or widget for others to display on their website. For donating to a cause, someone could get a “giving badge” to share.

A widget can be created to provide a special service to either clients or potential customers. Think industry news! Or a countdown till the release of a book, movie, or event. People love to display widgets (gadgets for windows) on their desktop and blog, so make sure whatever you create is versatile.

Sharing Your Favorites


In 1999 the web was new, and AOL was the one of the major internet providers. In comparison to today, I feel odd anytime I use Internet Explorer. We’ve come a long way in the evolution of internet browsers, although favorites/bookmarks are still a staple.

Poppy Wedding

Image Credit: "Poppy Wedding" By Sarah Parrott

The days of pressing the little heart to add a site to your favorites have passed. It’s no longer practical to connect your bookmarks to single web browser or computer. These days we have something new: Social Bookmarking.

How It Works

Step 1: Create an account on a social bookmarking site. (I use Diigo!)
Step 2: Surf the web, and find relevant content (It’s up to you to define relevant.)
Step 3: Using the bookmarking service, bookmark the link.
Step 4: Add tags to the bookmark, so you can find it next time you’re looking for it.
Step 5: Share these links with others by using public settings or connecting with your friends.

 

Benefits for Students

As a college student, I can use anywhere between 2 and 5 different computers in a single day. Some of the school computers connect through a common user name, but they still don’t connect to my personal laptop.
Group projects become simpler and easier when group members have a common group on a social bookmarking site to post links relevant to the project. I like to use social bookmarking in combination with Google Docs (it also has a chat feature). I can link to a reference material and the project assignment page.
Additionally, you can have one tag for an organization or your school website. For instance, I have a link to the library page, career center page, registrar office calendar page, and school intranet. I also have links to course pages (i.e. professor’s blog and textbook companion website).

Do you use social bookmarking? Why and how?

Side Note: I love using StumbleUpon. When you like a page, you actually save a bookmark for the page. StumbleUpon is different from other sites because it recommends new sites for you. Also, a great cure for boredom.

Facebook Lets It All Hang Loose


New Facebook Terms Allows Confiscating Furniture

Image Credit: "New Facebook Terms Allows Confiscating Furniture" By HubSpot

 

Whenever you add the latest app on Facebook, do you ever consider what you’re allowing them access to? How valuable are your email and phone number?

In an article posted on Mashable.com, @SarahFKessler looked at Facebook’s decision to allow third-party apps to access individual user’s information.

Since I’ve started using Facebook, there have always been tons of apps that seem essential to my interaction on the site. From Farmville to AOL, I love the idea of connecting all my sites with a single login. I have fewer passwords to keep track of this way!

However, consumers of Facebook have long faced the paradox of privacy and connecting. We inherently can’t connect with people unless we share something with them.

On Saturday, Facebook will launch the first verison of their new privacy policy. It will be devoid of all the lawyer-ish jargon that some complain makes the current version hard to understand.

I don’t think most people will bother looking at it. After all, nobody reads EULA’s anymore either (if they ever read them…) Do you think Facebook and lawmakers should protect us from own ignorance about privacy?

Jump On Board with Social Media


In the podcast “Speakers & Speeches: Social Media, Friend or Foe?” a panel at a Ragan Communication conference mock pitches social media to a CEO. The panel discusses a wide range of topics including blogs, facebook, and management of social media within a company.

Image Credit: "Working Together Teamwork Puzzle Concept" by lumaxart

I learned about company intranets, which I found useful. I’m currently a student, and have little interaction with intranets. Florida Southern College uses the “portal” to communicate with students, but the site has limited functionality. I think it would be helpful if the site had more functions that instructors knew how to utilize. The idea of a college-based intranet was the foundation for Facebook after all.  Where do you see the future of social media and education headed?

 

The panel also discussed splitting the work load of a blog among the company’s employees. I know that many blogs I read feature several different contributors. Disney actually uses this model on their company blog. I think the model works effectively for them. Do you know of any other company blogs that clearly identify multiple writers and use the model effectively?

Best Buy‘s employee social networking site was a highlighted case study in the podcast. Best Buy created Blue Shirt Nation as an internal social networking community for their employees. The site link is currently down. I went out and tried to find another example of an internal community. I was unable to locate one. Send me another one if you find one. I’d be interested in seeing what one looks like.

Lastly, I heard the idea of a “cloud” come up several times. My understanding of the term is that it’s a place where digital information is stored and can be accessed. I googled “digital cloud,” and it seems that the term refers to any information on the web. Do you think the world wide web is a cloud or a storm of information?

The Great Paradox of Social Media


Image Credit: "Social Media Monopoly" By clasesdeperiodismo

An interesting paradox exists between people and their privacy when it comes to social media. The very idea of social media as Mark Zuckeberg has pointed out time and time again is the ability to connect and share with people. We share all kinds of things from what we’re doing to everything we like (and everything we don’t!). We aim to connect with as many people as we can, but in the same breathe try to protect our privacy from intrusion.

Companies that have an interest in scooping up all that data we post on every.com site imaginable turn to social media monitoring services. Social Media Monitoring enables companies to easily see everything we put on social media sites from Facebook to Flickr, Twitter to LinkedIn. These monitoring companies offer a variety services including mining the data and formulating useful graphs and charts on our habits.

The Debate

In light of both our fight for privacy and our need to share, critics debate the ethics of social media monitoring. In “Debating the Ethics of Social Media Research” Jeffrey  Henning outlined the debate.

1.      Cite/obscure identities of commenters: Do you give credit to the source or do you obscure the identity of individuals when using the data?

2.       Seek/don’t seek permission: Do you get consent to use the data or accept that consent is not always possible to obtain?

3.      Engage/don’t engage with commenters: Do you respond to commentators and possibly influence them or sit passively respecting that individual may say things online that are not always true?

4.      Respect/ignore perceptions of privacy: Do you allow the users to think their privacy is being respected or accept that everything on the internet is public?

Weighing In

Image Credit: "3D Character and Question Mark" By 姒儿喵喵

I think that standard PR ethics codes (i.e. PRSA) can adequately address the problems associated with social media monitoring. I think knowing and understanding the target audience is also a big part of the process. Forrester’s Social Technographic Consumer Profiles can illuminate how your target uses social media.

Tag Cloud